lundi 16 mars 2015

Bienheureux JEAN AMIAS et ROBERT DALBY, prêtres et martyrs

Bienheureux Jean Amias et Robert Dalby, martyrs

Marchand de tissu, originaire de Wakefield en Angleterre, Jean Amias devenu veuf décida d'être prêtre catholique. Il étudia à Reims et y fut ordonné en 1581. Il revint clandestinement en Angleterre, alors que les prêtres catholiques étaient bannis du sol anglais. Il fut découvert, arrêté, jeté en prison et condamné à mort. Il subit le martyre en 1589 à York avec Robert Dalby, sous le règne d'Élisabeth Ière.  

Robert Dalby, lui, était un ministre protestant, né à Hemingborough dans le Yorkshire. Converti au catholicisme, il fit ses études à Reims et à Douai en vue du sacerdoce et fut ordonné prêtre en 1588. Il retourna lui aussi en Angleterre; au bout d'un an, il fut arrêté et, en tant que prêtre catholique, fut pendu à York. Tous deux allèrent joyeux au gibet où ils devaient être pendus.


Bienheureux Jean Amias et Robert Dalby

martyrs en Angleterre ( 1589)

Marchand de tissu, originaire de Wakefield en Angleterre, Jean Amias devenu veuf décida d'être prêtre catholique. Il étudia à Reims et y fut ordonné en 1581. Il revint clandestinement en Angleterre, alors que les prêtres catholiques étaient bannis du sol anglais. Il fut découvert, arrêté, jeté en prison et condamné à mort. Il subit le martyre à York avec Robert Dalby, sous le règne d'Élisabeth Ière.

Robert Dalby était un ministre protestant, né à Hemingborough dans le Yorkshire. Converti au catholicisme, il fit ses études à Reims et à Douai en vue du sacerdoce et fut ordonné prêtre en 1588. Il retourna lui aussi en Angleterre; au bout d'un an, il fut arrêté et, en tant que prêtre catholique, il fut pendu à York. Ils font partie des martyrs d'Angleterre et du pays de Galles béatifiés en 1929.

À York en Angleterre, l’an 1589, les bienheureux Jean Amias et Robert Dalby, prêtres et martyrs, qui furent condamnés à mort à cause uniquement de leur qualité de prêtres, sous la reine Élisabeth Ière, et allèrent joyeux au gibet où ils devaient être pendus.


Martyrologe romain


Blessed John Amias and Blessed Robert Dalby

On March 16, 1589, these two priests suffered being hung, drawn and quartered in York.

Robert Dalby was from Hemingbrough in the East Riding of Yorkshire and lived at first as a Protestant minister. Becoming a Catholic, he entered the English College at Rheims on 30 September 1586 to study for the priesthood. He was ordained a priest at Châlons on 16 April 1588. It was on 25 August that year that he set out for England. He was arrested almost immediately upon landing at Scarborough on the Yorkshire coast and imprisoned in York Castle.

There is some doubt about the early life of Blessed John Amias. One story is that he was indeed John Amias or Amyas, born at Wakefield in Yorkshire, England, where he married and raised a family, exercising the trade of cloth-merchant. On the death of his wife, he divided his property among his children and left for the Continent to become a priest. There is also a possibility that he was really William Anne (surname), youngest son of John and Katherine Anne, of Frickley near Wakefield.

Regardless of his actual name, on 22 June 1580, a widower calling himself "John Amias" entered the English College at Rheims to study for the priesthood. He was ordained a priest in Rheim Cathedral on 25 March 1581. On 5 June of that year Amias set out for Paris and then England, as a missionary, in the company of another priest, Edmund Sykes. Of his missionary life we know little. Towards the end of 1588 he was seized at the house of a Mr. Murton at Melling in Lancashire and imprisoned in York Castle.

Yorkshire, as I've commented before on this blog and in Supremacy and Survival: How Catholics Endured the English Reformation, was one of those districts of England where recusancy and Catholicism was particularly strong. This History of York describes the Catholic Resistance during Elizabeth I's reign, providing some details of the trouble the queen had in asserting her authority.



Blessed John Amias M (AC)
(also known as John Anne)

Born near Wakefield, England; died at York in 1589; beatified in 1929. Blessed John began life as a clothier (or clothmonger) at Wakefield. He married, but on his wife's death, studied for the priesthood at Rheims and was ordained in 1581. He was executed for his priesthood at York together with Blessed Robert Dalby (Attwater2, Benedictines).



Blessed Robert Dalby MM (AC)

Born in Hemingborough, Yorkshire, England; died at York in 1589; beatified in 1929. Blessed Robert was a convert from the Protestant ministry and was ordained a priest at Rheims in 1588. He was hanged for his priesthood with Father John Amias (Attwater2, Benedictines).




Blessed John Amias

Born at Wakefield, West Riding, England

Died March 16, 1589 at Tyburne Gallows, York, England

Beatified 1929

Canonization Pending

John Anne was a married cloth merchant from Wakefield, England. When his wife died in the 1570's, he sold his business and possessions, and distributed the proceeds to his children. Then he left for the continent to enter the seminary in Reims, France. He was ordained in 1581 and returned to his homeland, as to a foreign mission.

Like many of those men who became priests during this perod, he assumed an alias to protect his family, becoming known as John Amias. We don't know much about him, other than the obvious fact that he loved his faith enough to take tremendous risks for it, and ultimately to give his life. From 1581 until sometime in late 1588 or early 1589, he served as an underground priest. He was arrested at the home of a Mr. Murton, and charged with the crime of "priesthood".

He was martyred on the Tyburn Gallows Tree along with Blessed Robert Dalby on March 16th, 1589. It was said that he went to his death "merrily, as to a feaste".

Blessed Robert Dalby

Born in Yorkshire, England

Died March 16, 1589 at Tyburn Gallows, York, England

Beatified 1929

Canonization Pending

We know very little about Blessed Robert Dalby, as well. He was a protestant minister who converted to Catholicism, at a very dangerous time to do so. Upon his conversion he traveled to France to study for the priesthood at Douai. After his ordination in 1588, just one short year before his martyrdom, he returned home as a missionary to Catholics underground. He was arrested for the crime of being a priest, and was hung, drqawn and quartered alongside Blessed John Amias.




Ven. John Amias

An English Martyr; b. at Wakefield; d. at York, 16 March, 1589. He exercised the trade of a cloth-merchant in Wakefield until the death of his wife, when he divided his property among his children, and became a priest at Reims in 1581. Of his missionary life we know little; he was arrested at the house of a Mr. Murton in Lancashire, taken to York, and tried in company with two other martyrs, Dalby and Dibdale. Anthony (Dean) Champney was present at their execution, of which he has left an account in his history. Other accounts note that he went to death "as joyfully as if to a feast". He was declared Venerable in 1886.

Sources

CHALLONER; FOLEY, Records S.J., iii, 739; POLLEN, Acts of English Martyrs (London, 1891), 331.

Ryan, Patrick W.F. "Ven. John Amias." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 15 Mar. 2015 <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01428b.htm>.