samedi 25 avril 2015

Bienheureux ROBERT ANDERTON et WILLIAM MARSDEN, prêtres et martyrs


Bienheureux Guillaume Marsden et Robert Anderton, martyrs

Natifs du Lancashire, ils furent élevés au collège Sainte-Marie à Oxford. Après des études sacerdotales à Reims ils furent ordonnés en 1585. Un peu plus tard, ils furent exécutés dans l'île de Wight en 1586.


Bienheureux Robert Anderton et Guillaume Marsden

prêtres et martyrs en Angleterre ( 1586)

Nés en Angleterre, ils font leurs études à Oxford. Robert se convertit à la religion catholique et étudie à Reims où il est ordonné en 1585 comme Guillaume. L'année suivante, ils ont été martyrisés, pour avoir refusé de prêter le serment d'allégeance à la reine Élisabeth Ière, sur l'île de Wight. Ils ont été béatifiés en 1929.


Dans l’île de Wight en Angleterre, l’an 1586, les bienheureux Robert Anderton et Guillaume Marsden, prêtres et martyrs. Sous la reine Élisabeth Ière, ils furent condamnés à mort pour être entrés en Angleterre, alors qu’ils étaient prêtres, même si c’était seulement à la suite d’un naufrage, et allèrent au martyre avec un cœur ferme et tranquille.


Martyrologe romain


Robert Anderton

 1586

Il était né en Lancashire (Angleterre) dans une honorable famille et fit ses études au Collège anglais de Reims, où il s’acquit la réputation de vir doctissimus.

Une fois ordonné prêtre, il repassa en Angleterre avec son Confrère, William Marsden. Mais le bateau alla échouer sur l’Ile de Wight, où ils furent suspectés et appréhendés. N’ayant pas renié leur sacerdoce, ils furent mis en prison.

Ils firent remarquer qu’ils avaient accosté contre leur volonté, qu’ils n’avaient pas séjourné dans le royaume plus longtemps que le permettait la loi, avant qu’on les ait appréhendés, et que par conséquent ils n’étaient pas coupables de trahison, ni condamnables. Ils étaient fort adroits ! Mais les jurés écartèrent cette évidence et les condamnèrent à mort, pour haute trahison, étant des prêtres, donc dépendants de l’autorité romaine, et décidés à entrer dans le royaume.

Ils furent donc exécutés tous deux sur l’Ile de Wight, le 25 avril 1586.

Ils furent béatifiés en 1929. 


William Marsden

 1586

Il était né à Goosnargh (Lancashire, Angleterre) et fit ses études au Collège anglais de Reims.

Une fois ordonné prêtre, il repassa en Angleterre avec son Confrère, Robert Anderton. Mais le bateau alla échouer sur l’Ile de Wight, où ils furent suspectés et appréhendés. N’ayant pas renié leur sacerdoce, ils furent mis en prison.

Ils firent remarquer qu’ils avaient accosté contre leur volonté, qu’ils n’avaient pas séjourné dans le royaume plus longtemps que le permettait la loi, avant qu’on les ait appréhendés, et que par conséquent ils n’étaient pas coupables de trahison, ni condamnables. Ils étaient fort adroits ! Mais les jurés écartèrent cette évidence et les condamnèrent à mort, pour haute trahison, étant des prêtres, donc dépendants de l’autorité romaine, et décidés à entrer dans le royaume.

Ils furent donc exécutés tous deux sur l’Ile de Wight, le 25 avril 1586.

Ils furent béatifiés en 1929.

SOURCE : http://www.samuelephrem.eu/article-04-25-116073809.html

Blessed Robert Anderton and William Marsden MM (AC)

Born in Lincolnshire, England; died 1586; beatified in 1929. Both Robert Anderton and William Marsden were educated at Oxford (Robert at Brasenose College, William at Saint Mary Hall). After Robert's conversion to Catholicism he studied for the priesthood at Rheims and was ordained in 1585, as did William. The following year they were martyred on the Isle of Wight (Benedictines).



SOURCE : http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/0425.shtml


Ven. Robert Anderton

English priest and martyr, b. in the Isle of Wight about 1560; d. 25 April, 1586. He matriculated in Brasenose College, Oxford, in 1578. He afterwards went abroad, was converted, and then entered the college at Reims in 1580. It was there that he and Marsden began that companionship which was not broken even in death. Having completed their course, they set sail for England, but were overwhelmed in a storm. They prayed that they might die on land rather than on sea, and their prayer was granted. Driven ashore, they were at once seized and shortly after tried and condemned. They now pleaded that they had not transgressed the statute, as they had been cast on shore perforce. This led to their being summoned to London, where they were examined upon the celebrated "bloody question", whether they would fight against the Pope, even if the quarrel were for purely religious causes. Though they acknowledged Elizabeth as their lawful queen in all temporal matters, they would not consent to the required test. The sentence was then confirmed, and a proclamation was published, explaining their guilt. They were taken back and executed near the place where they had been cast ashore, being hanged, drawn, and quartered.

Sources

CHALLONER, Memoirs; POLLEN, Acts of English Martyrs (1891), 66-82.

Ryan, Patrick W.F. "Ven. Robert Anderton." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 25 Apr. 2015 <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01467c.htm>.

Profile

Graduated from Brasenose College, Oxford in 1578, and continued his studies abroad. Converted to Catholicism, and entered the English College at Rheims, France in 1580. Ordained at Rheims with his friend and co-worker Blessed William Marsden. Sailed for England as a home missioner, but their ship was driven off course, and wrecked on the Isle of Wight. Arrested soon after, they were charged with being priests on English soil. They argued that they had been shipwrecked, and had no choice about being there; due to the appeal, they were sent to London for further interrogation. There they acknowledged Elizabeth as their lawful queen in temporal matters, but would not not in matters spiritual. Martyred.

Born
Posted by catholic_saints


§  25 April

§  29 October as one of the Martyrs of Douai

Profile

Convert to Catholicism; entered the English College at Rheims, France in 1580. Ordained at Rheims with his friend and co-worker Blessed Robert Anderton. Sailed for England as a home missioner, but their ship was driven off course, and wrecked on the Isle of Wight. Arrested soon after, they were charged with being priests on English soil. They argued that they had been shipwrecked, and had no choice about being there; due to the appeal, they were sent to London for further interrogation. There they acknowledged Elizabeth as their lawful queen in temporal matters, but would not not in matters spiritual. Martyred.

Born

§  c.1560 at Lancashire, England


§  hanged, drawn, and quartered on 25 April 1586 on the beach of the Isle of Wight, England


§  8 December 1929 by Pope Pius XI (decree of martyrdom)


§  15 December 1929 by Pope Pius XI



Blessed William Marsden

A convert to Catholicism, William Marsden was born at Chipping, the son of a recusant yeoman named Richard Marsden. As a young man he went to France to be trained as a priest. After being ordained he set sail for England with another priest named Robert Anderton, who is thought to have come either from the Isle of Man or from Euxton Hall near Chorley. Whilst crossing the English Channel, a violent storm arose during which the two priests knelt and asked that they be saved so that they could suffer martyrdom. Their prayers were answered. On arriving at the Isle of Wight they were recognised almost immediately and sent to prison. At their trial the Anglican Bishop of Winchester taunted them with the “Pope Joan: myth and repeatedly mocked them for serving a woman in the Church. Anderton quickly replied that whether it was “Pope Joan” or Queen Elizabeth I, the Bishop approved of having a woman as “Head of the Church” and he was therefore in no position to criticise them on that account. Both were executed on the Isle of Wight on April 25th 1586.


Martyrs on the Isle of Wight

The Catholic Church of St. Mary's, Ride, on the Isle of Wight notes that 2004 "mark[ed] the 75th anniversary of the Beatification of the 136 English and Welsh martyrs [by Pope Pius XI in 1929]who gave their lives so heroically at the time of the Reformation and in the subsequent penal days. Two of the martyrs are particularly remembered on the Isle of Wight where they were executed in 1586. Blessed Robert Anderton and Blessed William Marsden had never intended to set foot on the Island. It was only by a freak storm at sea that their ship took shelter at Cowes. They were betrayed when they were heard praying, "O Lord thy Will be done! But if we are to die, suffer us to die for Thy cause in our own country. Let us not be remembered as the first seminarians who have perished in the waters". Of all the iniquitous laws against Catholics, Statute "27 Elizabeth" was the most ferocious as it made it high treason for a priest ordained abroad to set foot in England. There was generous financial reward for reporting papists so it was no surprise when on disembarking at Cowes they were immediately arrested and sent to Winchester for trial at the Spring Assizes.


Their story however starts when they first met at Rivington Grammer School near Chorley in Lancashire. The two young men immediately became friends. They became almost inseparable. They were to pray, study, travel and ultimate die together as martyrs for Christ. From Lancashire they went to Oxford to continue their education and were enrolled at Brasenose College in 1578. It is recorded that both were "unassuming but full of life and spirits and they were remarkable for their piety, devotion and zeal for all things sacred." (Pollen, Acts 82) They set off together in July 1580 for Douai College near Rheims and offered themselves to Almighty God in the Holy Priesthood. This seminary in France was the venue for many young Englishmen (such as Robert Anderton and William Marsden) who wished to study for the priesthood and return to offer Mass and spread the Faith in their native homeland. It was founded in 1568 by Cardinal William Allen. English Catholics liked to think of Douai as an "Oxford over the water" until happier days should return to the Dowry of Mary. . . .Read the rest here.

Note that there is an Ordinariate group based at St. Mary's Ride, with a former Anglican minister, now an ordained Catholic priest!