jeudi 22 octobre 2015

Saint DONATUS (DONAGH) de FIESOLE, évêque et confesseur


Andrea del Verrocchio (1436–1488). La Vierge Marie et l’Enfant Jésus avec saint Jean-Baptiste et saint Donat de Fiesole, vers 1480, huile sur bois, 189 X 191, Pistoia, Duomo


Saint Donat

Évêque ( 874)

Moine irlandais d'une grande érudition et d'une grande piété qui, passant par Fiesole, lors d'un pèlerinage à Rome, fut réclamé par le peuple pour en occuper le siège épiscopal. Durant 47 ans, il releva la Toscane dépouillée par les Normands et les empereurs.

À Fiesole en Toscane, vers 875, saint Donat Scot, évêque, d’une grande érudition et piété. Venu d’Irlande, en route vers Rome, il fut donné, par indication divine, au peuple de cette cité comme un excellent pasteur.

Martyrologe romain

SOURCE : http://nominis.cef.fr/contenus/saint/8633/Saint-Donat.html

Saint Donat de Fiesole

Moine irlandais

Fête le 22 octobre

† 874

Pèlerin irlandais, de retour de Rome, il arriva à Fiesole, dans la province de Florence, au moment où l’on allait élire le nouvel évêque. Lorsqu’il entra dans la cathédrale, les cloches se mirent à carillonner et l’assemblée y ayant vu un signe céleste, Donat fut nommé évêque.

SOURCE : http://www.martyretsaint.com/donat-de-fiesole/

Donatus (Donagh) of Fiesole B (RM)

Born in Ireland; died 874-876. Legend has it that Donatus was an Irishman who decided to go on a pilgrimage to Rome with his friend Andrew. On his return home about 829, he went to Florence, Italy, and visited nearby Fiesole. Donatus, who was small and unaggressive by nature, slipped into the cathedral just when the people had come together to pray for enlightenment before electing a new bishop.


The moment Donatus entered the cathedral of Fiesole, the bells began ringing. All the cathedral lamps and candles lit of their own accord, without any human help. The Christians present could only conclude that this was a divine sign, indicating that the stranger who had just come in was destined to be their next bishop. Unanimously the puzzled Irishman was elected, and Andrew became his deacon.
Fortunately, Donatus was a man of exemplary piety and cultivation. In addition to many other works, Donatus authored two separate lives of Saint Brigid of Kildare, one in prose and the other in verse. He also wrote his own epitaph, which still survives and describes him as a splendid teacher, specializing in grammar and fine writing. The epitaph adds that the bishop loyally advised and served the Frankish King Lothaire and the Emperor Louis. Almost certainly he taught them and members of their household for he was ever willing to instruct the young.

For 47 years Donatus shepherded the church of Fiesole. At times he served as a military leader, raising armies and conducting expeditions against the Saracens. Before he died he obtained from the king a charter of independence for the bishops of Fiesole with the power to impose taxes and administer their own laws.

He was also a generous supporter of monastic foundations. In 852, he founded a church and a hospice of his beloved patron, Saint Brigid at Piacenza and placed it under the protection of Saint Columban's monastery at Bobbio. This church was declared a national monument in 1911.

Long after his death, a legend developed that Donatus had an Irish travelling companion who became his archdeacon, St. Andrew of Fiesole, but there is no satisfactory evidence for Andrew's existence (Attwater, Bentley, Delaney, Montague).

In art he is a bishop with an Irish wolfhound at his feet. Sometimes he is shown pointing out a church to his deacon, St. Andrew of Ireland (August 22) (Roeder).

SOURCE : http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/1022.shtml

October 22

St. Donatus, Bishop of Fiesoli, in Tuscany, Confessor

HE was a pious and learned Scot, or Irishman, who, going a pilgrim to Rome, was stopped in Tuscany, and by compulsion made bishop of Fiesoli, in 816, which see he governed with admirable sanctity and wisdom. See his life compiled by Francis Callanius, bishop of Fiesoli; also the Roman Martyrology on this day; and Colgan, Act. SS. Hib. p. 237, n. 3.

Rev. Alban Butler (1711–73).  Volume X: October. The Lives of the Saints.  1866.

SOURCE : http://www.bartleby.com/210/10/223.html

St. Donatus, Bishop of Fiesole [1]

From The Wonders of Ireland by P. W. Joyce, 1911


IN every good History of Ireland we are told how missionaries and learned men went in great numbers from Ireland to the Continent in the early ages of Christianity to preach the Gospel and to teach in colleges. A full account of the lives and labours of these earnest and holy men would fill several volumes: but the following short sketch of one of them will give the reader a good idea of all.
Donatus was born in Ireland of noble parents towards the end of the eighth century. There is good reason to believe that he was educated in the monastic school of Inishcaltra, a little island in Lough Derg, near the Galway shore, now better known as Holy Island [2]: so that he was probably a native of that part of the country. Here he studied with great industry and success. He became a priest, and in course of time a bishop: and he was greatly distinguished as a professor.

Having spent a number of years teaching, he resolved to make a pilgrimage to Rome and visit the holy places on the way. He had a favourite pupil named Andrew belonging to a noble Irish family, a handsome, high-spirited youth, but of a deeply religious turn: and these two, master and scholar, were much attached. And when Donatus made known his intention to go as a pilgrim to foreign lands, Andrew, who could not bear to be separated from him, begged to be permitted to go with him: to which Donatus consented. When they had made the few simple preparations necessary, they went down to the shore, accompanied by friends and relatives; and bidding farewell to all—home, friends, and country—amid tears and regrets, they set sail and landed on the coast of France.

And now, here were these two men, with stout hearts, determined will, and full trust in God, exhibiting an excellent example of what numberless Irish exiles of those days gave up, and of what trials and dangers they exposed themselves to, for the sake of religion. One was a successful teacher and a bishop; the other a young chief; and both might have lived in their own country a life of peace and plenty. But they relinquished all that for a higher and holier purpose; and they brought with them neither luxury nor comfort. They had, on landing, just as much money and food as started them on their journey; and with a small satchel strapped on shoulder, containing a book or two, some relics, and other necessary articles, and with stout staff in hand, they travelled the whole way on foot.

Whenever a monastery lay near their road, there they called, sure of a kind reception, and rested for a day or two. When no monastery was within reach, they simply begged for food and night-shelter as they fared along, making themselves understood by the peasantry as best they could, for they knew little or nothing of their language. Much hardship they endured from hunger and thirst, bad weather, rough paths that often led them astray, and constant fatigue. They were sometimes in danger too from rude and wicked peasants, some of whom thought no more of killing a stranger than of killing a sparrow. But before setting out, the two pilgrims knew well the hardships and dangers in store for them on the way: so that they were quite prepared for all this: and on they trudged contented and cheerful, never swerving an instant from their purpose.

They travelled in a sort of zigzag way, continually turning aside to visit churches, shrines, hermitages, and all places consecrated by memory of old-time saints, or of past events of importance in the history of Christianity. And whenever they heard, as they went slowly along, of a man eminent for holiness and learning, they made it a point to visit him so as to have the benefit of his conversation and advice; using the Latin language, which all learned men spoke in those times.


[1] Fiesole in Tuscany, Italy; pronounced in four syllables: Fee-ess'-o-le.

[2] In the "Child's History of Ireland" there is a picture of the round tower and church ruins on this little island.

SOURCE : http://www.libraryireland.com/Wonders/St-Donatus-1.php

Donatus (Donagh) of Fiesole B (RM)

Born in Ireland; died 874-876. Legend has it that Donatus was an Irishman who decided to go on a pilgrimage to Rome with his friend Andrew. On his return home about 829, he went to Florence, Italy, and visited nearby Fiesole. Donatus, who was small and unaggressive by nature, slipped into the cathedral just when the people had come together to pray for enlightenment before electing a new bishop.


The moment Donatus entered the cathedral of Fiesole, the bells began ringing. All the cathedral lamps and candles lit of their own accord, without any human help. The Christians present could only conclude that this was a divine sign, indicating that the stranger who had just come in was destined to be their next bishop. Unanimously the puzzled Irishman was elected, and Andrew became his deacon.
Fortunately, Donatus was a man of exemplary piety and cultivation. In addition to many other works, Donatus authored two separate lives of Saint Brigid of Kildare, one in prose and the other in verse. He also wrote his own epitaph, which still survives and describes him as a splendid teacher, specializing in grammar and fine writing. The epitaph adds that the bishop loyally advised and served the Frankish King Lothaire and the Emperor Louis. Almost certainly he taught them and members of their household for he was ever willing to instruct the young.

For 47 years Donatus shepherded the church of Fiesole. At times he served as a military leader, raising armies and conducting expeditions against the Saracens. Before he died he obtained from the king a charter of independence for the bishops of Fiesole with the power to impose taxes and administer their own laws.

He was also a generous supporter of monastic foundations. In 852, he founded a church and a hospice of his beloved patron, Saint Brigid at Piacenza and placed it under the protection of Saint Columban's monastery at Bobbio. This church was declared a national monument in 1911.

Long after his death, a legend developed that Donatus had an Irish travelling companion who became his archdeacon, St. Andrew of Fiesole, but there is no satisfactory evidence for Andrew's existence (Attwater, Bentley, Delaney, Montague).

In art he is a bishop with an Irish wolfhound at his feet. Sometimes he is shown pointing out a church to his deacon, St. Andrew of Ireland (August 22) (Roeder).