lundi 27 février 2017

Bienheureux ROGER FILCOCK, prêtre jésuite et martyr

Bienheureux Roger Filcock

Martyr en Angleterre ( 1601)

Roger Filcock (1570-1601) 

arrêté en Angleterre pendant sa période probatoire avant d'entrer chez les jésuites. Il a étudié à Reims, puis à Valladolid.

Avec le père Marc Barkworth, bénédictin, il fut traîné dans les rues de Tyburn. Les deux prêtres s'encouragèrent en priant ensemble. Ils arrivèrent juste après l’exécution d'Anne Line qui avait été la pénitente du père Filcock.


Voir aussi:

- Biographies des six saints et des seize bienheureux du collège de saint Alban, le séminaire anglais de Valladolid. (en anglais)

À Londres, en 1601, sainte Anne Line, veuve et martyre. Née de parents calvinistes, qui la déshéritèrent et la chassèrent de chez eux quand elle devint catholique, elle épousa Roger Line, qui mourut en exil à cause de la foi catholique. Après sa mort, elle fournit un hébergement à des prêtres à Londres, et pour cela, fut pendue à Tyburn, sous la reine Élisabeth Ière. Avec elle subirent le même supplice les bienheureux prêtres et martryrs Marc Barkworth, bénédictin, et Roger Felcock, de la Compagnie de Jésus, qui furent mis en pièces alors qu’ils respiraient encore.


Martyrologe romain

Blessed Roger Filcock

Also known as
  • Arthur Nayler
Profile

Educated at Rheims, France and Valladolid, Spain. Ordained in Valladolid c.1597. He returned to England in 1598 to minister to covert Catholics. Jesuit. Friend of Saint Anne Line. Arrested and condemned for the crime of priesthood. Died with Saint Anne Line and Blessed Mark Barkworth. One of the Martyrs of England, Scotland, and Wales.

Born

Blessed Roger Filcock

Roger Filcock (1570-1601) was arrested in England while he was fulfilling a probationary period prior to entering the Jesuits. He had studied at the English College in Rheims, France and then in Valladolid, Spain, but when he asked to join the Society he was encouraged to apply again after ministering for awhile in England.

His journey into England was difficult enough. The ship he was traveling on from Bilbao, Spain to Calais, France, was becalmed just outside the port and fell pray to a Dutch ship blockading the harbor. Filcock was captured, but managed to escape and land surreptitiously on the shore in Kent in 1598. Soon after he began his ministry, he contacted Father Henry Garnet, the Jesuit superior, asking to become a Jesuit. He was accepted into the Society in 1600, but then was betrayed by someone he had studied with in Spain. He was arrested and committed to Newgate Prison in London. His trial did not last long, despite the fact that there was no evidence against him and that the names in the indictment were not names he had used. Together with Father Mark Barkworth, a Benedictine, he was tied to a hurdle and dragged through the streets to Tyburn. Barkworth was first to be hung, disembowelled and quartered. Filcock had to watch his companion suffer, knowing that he would immediately follow. The two priests prayed antiphonally to support each other.


Blessed Roger Filcock

Born at Sandwich, Kent, the son of Simon and Margaret Lowe (or Low), he entered the English College at Rheims on 15 June 1581. From there he was sent on 29 September 1581 to the English College, Valladolid, where he arrived on 20 February 1591. There is no record of where and when he was ordained a priest, but this happened by October 1597, when he left the college and sailed from Bilbao to Calais in December. His desire was to enter the Society of Jesus, but it was considered prudent that he first gain some experience on the mission, as indeed he did. He was admitted as a Jesuit novice by Father Henry Garnet in 1600 and should have proceeded to Flanders to the novitiate, but was in the meantime arrested on suspicion of being a priest and sent to Newgate gaol in London.
During his time as a missioner he had known Anne Line, a convert to the Catholic faith and widow whose husband had died in exile after being caught attending Mass. She had managed a variety of safe-houses for priests and lay faithful. Filcock had also been Line's confessor.

Born at Sandwich, Kent, the son of Simon and Margaret Lowe (or Low), he entered the English College at Rheims on 15 June 1581. From there he was sent on 29 September 1581 to the English College, Valladolid, where he arrived on 20 February 1591. There is no record of where and when he was ordained a priest, but this happened by October 1597, when he left the college and sailed from Bilbao to Calais in December. His desire was to enter the Society of Jesus, but it was considered prudent that he first gain some experience on the mission, as indeed he did. He was admitted as a Jesuit novice by Father Henry Garnet in 1600 and should have proceeded to Flanders to the novitiate, but was in the meantime arrested on suspicion of being a priest and sent to Newgate gaol in London.

During his time as a missioner he had known Anne Line, a convert to the Catholic faith and widow whose husband had died in exile after being caught attending Mass. She had managed a variety of safe-houses for priests and lay faithful. Filcock had also been Line's confessor.

On Candlemas Day, 1601, Father Francis Page was about to celebrate Mass in her lodgings when priest-catchers broke in. The priest escaped in the confusion but his hostess was arrested and put on trial at the Old Bailey on 26 February, either 1601 or 1602, indicted for harbouring a priest. Although this could not be proved, she was condemned and led to the gallows the next day. She was executed at the same occasion as Dom Mark Barkworth, a Benedictine monk, and Filcock, who had gone on trial on 23 February. This was the first execution of Catholics at Tyburn since 1595.

In St John's church there is a memorial window to Blessed Roger Filcock in the Lady Chapel, where a red candle burns to remind us of his faith and sacrifice, and our own call to holiness. 

SOURCE : http://www.catholicmas.com/blessedrogerfilcock.htm

Blessed Roger Filcock (1570-1601) was arrested in England while he was fulfilling a probationary period prior to entering the Jesuits. He had studied at the English College in Rheims, France and then in Valladolid, Spain, but when he asked to join the Society he was encouraged to apply again after ministering for awhile in England.

His journey into England was difficult enough. The ship he was traveling on from Bilbao, Spain to Calais, France, was becalmed just outside the port and fell pray to a Dutch ship blockading the harbor. Filcock was captured, but managed to escape and land surreptitiously on the shore in Kent in 1598. Soon after he began his ministry, he contacted Father Henry Garnet, the Jesuit superior, asking to become a Jesuit. He was accepted into the Society in 1600, but then was betrayed by someone he had studied with in Spain. He was arrested and committed to Newgate Prison in London. His trial did not last long, despite the fact that there was no evidence against him and that the names in the indictment were not names he had used. Before he suffered, he paid tribute to Father Barkworth, saying, "Pray for me to our Lord, whose presence you now enjoy, that I too may faithfully run my course."

St. Anne Line was among the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970. She, St. Margaret Clitherow and St. Margaret Ward share a separate Feast on August 30 (the date of St. Margaret Ward's martyrdom in 1588) in the dioceses of England. Blessed Mark Barkworth was beatified by Pope Pius XI on 15 December 1929. Pope John Paul II beatified Blessed Roger Filcock on the 22nd of November 1987. 

SOURCE : http://supremacyandsurvival.blogspot.ca/2016_02_01_archive.html

Beato Ruggero Filcock Sacerdote gesuita, martire




Sandwich, Inghilterra, circa 1572 – Londra, Inghilterra, 27 febbraio 1601

Roger Filcock, vissuto all’epoca della regina Elisabetta I, frequentò i collegi per futuri missionari inglesi di Reims e Valladolid, retti dalla Compagnia di Gesù. Egli stesso domandò di essere ammesso in quella congregazione, ma gli venne suggerito di attendere e di guadagnare esperienza. Tornato in Inghilterra, intraprese il ministero sotto falso nome (Nayler o Arthur), ma venne scoperto e arrestato. Condannato a morte, venne impiccato e squartato a Londra il 27 febbraio 1601, dopo il suo compagno di prigionia, il benedettino Mark Barkworth, e una sua penitente, la vedova Anne Line. È stato beatificato il 22 novembre 1987.

Martirologio Romano: A Londra in Inghilterra, sant’Anna Line, vedova e martire, che, morto il marito in esilio per la fede cattolica, procurò in questa città una casa ai sacerdoti e per questo, sotto la regina Elisabetta I, a Tyburn fu impiccata. Insieme a lei patirono anche i beati sacerdoti e martiri Marco Barkworth, dell’Ordine di San Benedetto, e Ruggero Filcock, della Compagnia di Gesù, dilaniati con la spada mentre erano ancora vivi.

Figlio di Simon e Margaret Lowe (o Low), Roger Filcock nacque a Sandwich nel Kent. Frequentò il collegio retto dai Gesuiti a Reims, in Francia, dove si formavano i futuri missionari per riportare il cattolicesimo in Inghilterra. Nel 1590 i Gesuiti aprirono un nuovo centro di formazione, il Real Collegio di Sant’Albano a Valladolid, in Spagna, e Filcock vi si trasferì il 20 febbraio 1591.


Desiderava entrare nella Compagnia di Gesù, ma fu invitato ad attendere il ritorno in patria per riprovarci e guadagnare esperienze. Non esistono dati certi sulla sua ordinazione sacerdotale, ma dovette sicuramente accadere prima dell’ottobre 1597, quando lasciò il Collegio e, a dicembre, salpò da Bilbao, diretto verso Calais. 

La nave su cui viaggiava, però, venne inseguita da velieri olandesi: piuttosto che lasciarsi catturare, molti passeggeri si gettarono in mare e riuscirono ad arrivare a riva. Filcock, invece, venne catturato, ma riuscì a scappare e approdò sulla costa del Kent agli inizi del 1598. Assunto il falso nome di Nayler o Arthur, intraprese il suo ministero sacerdotale. Durante la sua attività, divenne il confessore di Anne Line, una vedova che si era occupata di alcuni rifugi per sacerdoti e laici cattolici, il cui marito era morto in esilio dopo essere stato sorpreso a partecipare alla Messa.

Nel frattempo, rimase fermamente deciso a riprovare l’ammissione tra i Gesuiti: scrisse quindi al superiore in Inghilterra, padre Henry Garnet, per domandargli il consenso. Con sua grande gioia, gli venne concesso nel 1600, insieme alla destinazione per compiere il noviziato nelle Fiandre.

Ma, proprio mentre si preparava a partire, venne tradito da un ex compagno di studi a Valladolid, arrestato e condotto nel carcere di Newgate, a Londra. Accusato di essere un sacerdote, non ammise e neppure negò, ma insistette che venissero presentati prove e testimoni a riguardo. Dato che nessuno si presentò, venne processato: chiese di non avere una giuria, in quanto non voleva che il verdetto, che sarebbe stato chiaramente contro di lui, pesasse sulle coscienze dei giurati. Tuttavia, il giudice pilotò la giuria in modo da dichiararlo colpevole per alto tradimento, la pena abituale per chi riconosceva solo nel Papa la suprema autorità religiosa anche per gli inglesi.

In prigione, padre Filcock incontrò Mark Barkworth, un suo compagno di studi in Spagna, Oblato benedettino. Il 27 febbraio, giorno fissato per l’esecuzione, la prima che vedeva oggetto dei cattolici dal 1595, i due vennero legati insieme, attaccati a una gogna e trascinati al Tyburn, dov’era preparato per loro il patibolo. Lungo la strada, Barkworth intonò in latino il Salmo del giorno di Pasqua: «Questo è il giorno che ha fatto il Signore: rallegriamoci in esso ed esultiamo»; padre Filcock lo seguì nel canto.

Arrivarono al Tyburn poco dopo l’esecuzione di Anne Line. Al vedere il suo corpo che ancora pendeva dal cappio, il gesuita le baciò la mano (altre fonti dicono l’orlo della sua veste) ed esclamò: «Beata Anne Line, mille volte più beata di me, mi hai battuto nella gara e nel guadagnare la corona. Ma presto ti seguiremo, se l’Onnipotente vorrà».

Poco dopo, fu il turno del suo compagno di prigionia. Padre Filcock osservò il massacro cui il suo cadavere venne sottoposto, ma non desistette dalla sua volontà di martirio. Quando toccò a lui, lo sceriffo tentò di fargli confessare il tradimento, ma lui negò coraggiosamente. Citando san Paolo, affermò: «Desidero essere dissolto ed essere con Cristo» e aggiunse che stava per morire in quanto «cattolico, sacerdote e membro della Compagnia di Gesù».

Dopo una breve preghiera, gli venne sottratto il carretto da sotto i piedi. Successivamente, dopo che gli venne tagliata la corda, venne sventrato e squartato.

Padre Roger Filcock fu inserito in un gruppo di ottantacinque candidati agli altari inglesi del sedicesimo secolo, la cui causa di beatificazione venne introdotta il 9 dicembre 1886. Il decreto sul loro martirio arrivò cent’anni dopo, il 10 novembre 1986, e aprì la via alla beatificazione, avvenuta il 22 novembre 1987.

Autore: Emilia Flocchini