samedi 25 février 2017

Bienheureux CONSTANT (COSTANZO) SERVOLI de FABRIANO, prêtre dominicain

Bienheureux Constant Servoli de Fabriano

Prêtre dominicain ( 1481)

Homme zélé menant une vie austère et homme de paix, il prit part à la réforme de l'Ordre. Son corps est encore vénéré dans l'église de Saint Pierre d'Ascoli Piceno, alors que son chef l'est dans la cathédrale de Fabriano.

À Ascoli Piceno dans les Marches, en 1481, le bienheureux Constant Servoli de Fabriano, prêtre de l’Ordre des Prêcheurs, qui s’illustra par l’austérité de sa vie et son zèle à promouvoir la paix.

Martyrologe romain

SOURCE : http://nominis.cef.fr/contenus/saint/11476/Bienheureux-Constant-Servoli-de-Fabriano.html

Bx Costanzo (Constant) Servoli

Prêtre o.p. († 1481)

Costanzo Servoli naît en 1410 à Fabriano (province d’Ancône, dans la région Marches, en Italie centrale). Les anciens historiens de l’Ordre l’appellent « illustre et très brillante étoile du ciel dominicain ».

De famille modeste, il entra dans l’Ordre à 15 ans et eut comme maîtres St Antonino, de Florence (1389-1459)puis le Bx Corradino de Brescia. Avec de si bons guides, il devint un parfait frère prêcheur.

Homme zélé menant une vie austère et homme de paix, il prit part à la réforme de l'Ordre. De 1440 à 1467 il fut prieur à Fabriano, en 1445 à Pérouse, en 1459 et 1470 à Ascoli Piceno. 

Dans la ville d’Ascoli, presque détruite par la discorde civile, il ramena la paix. Il restaura entièrement le couvent Saint-Dominique, où il fit refleurir les études et la discipline régulière, et où il termina sa carrière le 24 février 1481.

Âme de prière, il disait que le Seigneur ne lui avait jamais refusé une grâce quand il récitait le Psautier entier. En plus de l’office divin, il récitait l’office des morts chaque jour. Son corps est encore vénéré dans l'église San Pietro martire d’Ascoli Piceno, alors que son chef l'est dans la Cathédrale de Fabriano, sa ville natale, qui l’a choisi comme Patron.

Le Pape Pie VII (Barnaba Chiaramonti, 1800-1823), le 22 septembre1821, a accordé la Messe et l’office propre.

Source principale : cite-catholique.org (« Rév. x gpm »).  

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2017


Blessed Constantius of Fabriano, OP (AC)

Born in Fabriano, Marches of Ancona, Italy, 1410; died at Ascoli, Italy, 1481; equivalently beatified in 1821 (or 1811).


Constantius Bernocchi is as close to a 'sad saint' as it's possible for a Dominican to get; he is said to have had the gift of tears. However, that is not his only claim to fame.

Constantius had an remarkable childhood, not only for the usual signs of precocious piety, but also for a miracle that he worked when he was a little boy. Constantius had a sister who had been bedridden most of her nine years of life. One day, the little boy brought his parents in to her bedside and made them pray with him. The little girl rose up, cured, and she remained well for a long and happy life. Naturally, the parents were amazed, and they were quite sure it had not been their prayers that effected the cure, but those of their little son.

Constantius entered the Dominicans at age 15, and had as his masters Blessed Conradin and Saint Antoninus. He did well in his studies and wrote a commentary on Aristotle. His special forte was Scripture, and he studied it avidly. After his ordination, he was sent to teach in various schools in Italy, arriving eventually at the convent of San Marco in Florence, which had been erected as a house of strict observance. Constantius was eventually appointed prior of this friary that was a leading light in the reform movement. This was a work dear to his heart, and he himself became closely identified with the movement.

Several miracles and prophecies are related about Constantius during his stay in Florence. He one day told a student not to go swimming, because he would surely drown if he did. The student, of course, dismissed the warning and drowned. One day, Constantius came upon a man lying in the middle of the road. The man had been thrown by his horse and was badly injured; he had a broken leg and a broken arm. All he asked was to be taken to some place where care could be given him, but Constantius did better than that--he cured the man and left him, healed and astonished.

Constantius was made prior of Perugia, where he lived a strictly penitential life. Perhaps the things that he saw in visions were responsible for his perpetual sadness, for he foresaw many of the terrible things that would befall Italy in the next few years. He predicted the sack of Fabriano, which occurred in 1517. At the death of Saint Antoninus, he saw the saint going up to heaven, a vision which was recounted in the canonization process.

Blessed Constantius is said to have recited the Office of the Dead every day, and often the whole 150 Psalms, which he knew by heart, and used for examples on every occasion. He also said that he had never been refused any favor for which he had recited the whole psalter. He wrote a number of books; these, for the most part, were sermon material, and some were the lives of the blesseds of the order.

On the day of Constantius's death, little children of the town ran through the streets crying out, "The holy prior is dead! The holy prior is dead!" On hearing of his death, the city council met and stated that it was a public calamity.

The relics of Blessed Constantius have suffered from war and invasion. After the Dominicans were driven from the convent where he was buried, his tomb was all but forgotten for a long time. Then one of the fathers put the relics in the keeping of Camaldolese monks in a nearby monastery, where they still remain (Benedictines, Dorcy, Encyclopedia).
SOURCE : http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/0225.shtml

Blessed Constantius of Fabriano

Also known as
  • Constantius Bernocchi
  • Constantius Servoli
  • Constantius di Meo
  • Costanzo….
  • Costante….
Profile

Known as a pious child; Constantius once convinced his parents to pray with him for the healing of his terminally ill sister – and she was immediately cured. He joined the Dominicans at age 15 at the convent of Santa Lucia. Spiritual student of Blessed Laurence of Ripafratta, Blessed Corradino of Brescia and Saint Antoninus of Florence. Reforming prior of friars in the Italian cities of Florence, Fabriano, Perugia and Ascoli Piceno. Noted preacher and peacemaker in local disturbances; worked with Blessed Peitro da Mogliano and Saint James of the March. Known for his deep prayer life, as a miracle worker. and for his gift of prophecy; he miraculously knew the instant of the death of Saint Antoninus. He was considered a saint in life by all who knew him.

Born

God of justice and truth, you made Blessed Constantius renowned for his unceasing prayer and his zeal for peace. By the help of his prayers may we walk in the path of justice and reach everlasting peace and glory. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. – General Calendar of the Order of Preachers


Blessed Constantius, C.O.P.

      Memorial day: February 25th

Profile

    Constantius Bernocchi is as close to a 'sad saint' as it's possible for a Dominican to get; he is said to have had the gift of tears. However, that is not his only claim to fame. Constantius had an remarkable childhood, not only for the usual signs of precocious piety, but also for a miracle that he worked when he was a little boy. Constantius had a sister who had been bedridden most of her nine years of life. One day, the little boy brought his parents in to her bedside and made them pray with him. The little girl rose up, cured, and she remained well for a long and happy life. Naturally, the parents were amazed, and they were quite sure it had not been their prayers that effected the cure, but those of their little son.

    Constantius entered the Dominicans at age 15, and had as his masters Blessed Conradin and Saint Antoninus. He did well in his studies and wrote a commentary on Aristotle. His special forte was Scripture, and he studied it avidly. After his ordination, he was sent to teach in various schools in Italy, arriving eventually at the convent of San Marco in Florence, which had been erected as a house of strict observance. Constantius was eventually appointed prior of this friary that was a leading light in the reform movement. This was a work dear to his heart, and he himself became closely identified with the movement.

    Several miracles and prophecies are related about Constantius during his stay in Florence. He one day told a student not to go swimming, because he would surely drown if he did. The student, of course, dismissed the warning and drowned. One day, Constantius came upon a man lying in the middle of the road. The man had been thrown by his horse and was badly injured; he had a broken leg and a broken arm. All he asked was to be taken to some place where care could be given him, but Constantius did better than that--he cured the man and left him, healed and astonished.

    Constantius was made prior of Perugia, where he lived a strictly penitential life. Perhaps the things that he saw in visions were responsible for his perpetual sadness, for he foresaw many of the terrible things that would befall Italy in the next few years. He predicted the sack of Fabriano, which occurred in 1517. At the death of Saint Antoninus, he saw the saint going up to heaven, a vision which was recounted in the canonization process.

    Blessed Constantius is said to have recited the Office of the Dead every day, and often the whole 150 Psalms, which he knew by heart, and used for examples on every occasion. He also said that he had never been refused any favor for which he had recited the whole psalter. He wrote a number of books; these, for the most part, were sermon material, and some were the lives of the blesseds of the order.

    On the day of Constantius's death, little children of the town ran through the streets crying out, "The holy prior is dead! The holy prior is dead!" On hearing of his death, the city council met and stated that it was a public calamity.

    The relics of Blessed Constantius have suffered from war and invasion. After the Dominicans were driven from the convent where he was buried, his tomb was all but forgotten for a long time. Then one of the fathers put the relics in the keeping of Camaldolese monks in a nearby monastery, where they still remain (Benedictines, Dorcy, Encyclopedia).

Born: Born in the early part of the 15th century in Fabriano, Marches of Ancona, Italy

Died: 1481 of natural causes; the local senate and council assembled at the news of his death, proclaimed it a "public calamity", and voted to pay for the funeral

Beatified: 1821 (cultus confirmed) by Pope Pius VII

First Vespers:

Ant. Strengthen by holy intercession, O Constantius, confessor of the Lord, those here present, have we who are burdened with the weight of our offenses may be relieved by the glory of thy blessedness, and may by thy guidance attain eternal rewards.

V. Pray for us, Blessed Constantius.

R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Lauds:

Ant. Well done, good and faithful servant, because Thou has been faithful in a few things, I will set thee over many, sayeth the Lord.

V. The just man shall blossom like the lily.

R. And shall flourish forever before the Lord.

Second Vespers:

Ant. I will liken him unto a wise man, who built his house upon a rock..

V. Pray for us. Blessed Constantius.

R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Prayer:

Let us Pray: O God, who didst make Blessed Constantius, Thy Confessor, glorious by his continual exercise of prayer and his zeal in the promotion of peace among the people, grant through his intercession, that, walking always in the paths of justice, we may attain to everlasting peace and glory. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.


Beato Costanzo Servoli da Fabriano Domenicano


Fabriano ? - Ascoli, 1481

Fu un religioso tutto dedito alla preghiera: oltre all'Ufficio divino era solito celebrare ogni giorno l'intero Ufficio dei defunti. Uomo di vita austera e zelante nel promuovere la pace, fu tra coloro che con maggior successo riformarono la vita regolare nell'Ordine. Morì il 24 febbraio ad Ascoli Piceno, dove il suo corpo è ancora venerato nella chiesa di s. Pietro martire; mentre il suo capo si trova nella cattedrale di Fabriano.

Martirologio Romano: Ad Ascoli Piceno, beato Costanzo Sérvoli da Fabriano, sacerdote dell’Ordine dei Predicatori, che si distinse per austerità di vita e impegno nel promuovere la pace.

Gli antichi storici dell’Ordine Domenicano chiamano Costanzo da Fabriano “illustre e lucidissima stella del cielo domenicano". Nato a Fabriano agli inizi del XV° secolo, da Bernardo Servoli, uomo di modeste condizioni sociali, entrò nell’Ordine a quindici anni, dove ebbe come maestri Sant’Antonino e in seguito Corradino da Brescia. Sotto si abili guide divenne un compito modello di Frate Predicatore. Grande fu la sua azione, sia nell’Ordine, lavorando efficacemente a propagare e a stabilire nei vari conventi quella rinnovata vita domenicana instaurata da quei generosi figli di S. Domenico accesi dalla nobile brama di far rivivere nella sua integrità l’ideale del Fondatore, sia tra il popolo fedele, riconducendo con la potente parola le anime a Dio, e ricomponendo gli atroci odi di parte. Nel 1440 e 1467 fu Priore a Fabriano, nel 1445 a Perugia, e nel 1459 e 1470 ad Ascoli. Nella città di Ascoli, vicina a distruggersi per le discordie civili, egli riportò il sereno e la pace. Restaurò dalle fondamenta il convento di S. Domenico, dove fece rifiorire gli studi e la disciplina regolare e dove chiuse la sua carriera. Anima di preghiera, diceva che nessuna grazia il Signore non gli aveva mai negata alla recita dell’intero Salterio, e quando volle dirlo per ottenere che i Turchi desistessero dall’infliggere alla Grecia l’estrema rovina, non gli riuscì mai di finirlo, comprendendo egli con questo che nessuna preghiera non poteva mai placare l’ira divina, provocata da tanta ostinazione. Morì ad Ascoli Piceno il 24 febbraio 1481 e il suo corpo riposa nella chiesa di San Pietro Martire. Fabriano, sua città natale, e dove con grande venerazione, in cattedrale, si conservano il suo capo, lo ha eletto suo Patrono. Papa Pio VII il 22 settembre 1821 ha concesso la Messa e l’ufficio propri.


Autore: Franco Mariani