mercredi 10 juin 2015

Bienheureux HENRI (ENRICO) de BOLZANO (ou de TRÉVISE), pénitent laïc et confesseur

Veduta di Bolzano con la Beata Vergine e il beato Arrigo quali patroni della città. 
Olio su tela, 1802 ca., Museo Civico di Bolzano

Bienheureux Henri de Bolzano

Pénitent laïc ( 1315)

Il ne savait ni lire ni écrire, mais il fréquentait quotidiennement la Sainte Messe, priait et méditait longuement la Parole de Dieu. Petit et contrefait, il subissait avec patience les moqueries. Bûcheron peu fortuné, il donnait son salaire aux pauvres et aux mendiants. Les miracles accompagnèrent sa vie.

À Trévise en Vénétie, l’an 1315, le bienheureux Henri de Bolzano. Bûcheron illettré, il donnait aux miséreux presque tout son salaire et, quand ses forces défaillirent, il continua, au jour le jour, à vivre d’aumônes, qu’il partageait avec des mendiants.


Martyrologe romain



 Blessed Henry of Treviso (AC)
(also known as Arrigo, Rigo)

Born in Bolzano, Tyrol, Italy; died June 10, 1315; cultus approved by Benedict XIV. Henry was the son of poor parents. Although he did not have the advantage of a formal education, he studied earnestly the ways of God. In his youth he left Bolzano to seek work in Treviso as a hired laborer. He applied himself to every task with unwearied cheerfulness, unbroken by any affliction and sanctified by a spirit of penance and recollection. He was diligent in attending at the whole divine office and all public prayers that he could. Daily he heard Mass with devotion and confessed his sins. When his work prevented attendance, he joined spiritually with those who sang the divine praises. He lived an abstemious life in order that he could secretly give more to the poor. But Henry never prayed to draw attention; he tried always to conceal his devotions and virtues from the eyes of others. His humility, however, was unmistakable; when others mocked him he answered with kind words and a prayer. In his old age he was given lodgings by a pious lawyer and lived on alms he collected daily--he never reserved anything for the next day but gave what he could to those more indigent than himself. When he died, an incredible variety of people came to view the body and say goodbye. The magistrates appointed three notaries to make a written account of the miracles wrought by Henry before and after his death. In total during the few days between his death and his burial 276 miracles were recorded. Every person sought to take some small relic, but there was so little: a hair shirt; a log of wood that served as a pillow; and twigs, cord, and straw that were his bed (Benedictines, Husenbeth).

SOURCE : http://www.saintpatrickdc.org/ss/0610.shtml

June 10

B. Henry of Treviso, Confessor

HE was a native of Bolsano, in the mountainous part of Tyrol, between Trent and Brescia, and of mean extraction. The poverty of his parents deprived him of the advantage of a school education, but from his infancy he studied earnestly to improve every day in the love of God, the true science of a Christian. In quest of work he left Bolsano in his youth, and settled at Treviso the capital city of a province in the Venetian territories. He gained his bread by day labour, to which he applied himself with unwearied cheerfulness, and which he sanctified by a spirit of penance and recollection. He could not read, but he never failed to assist at all sermons and instructions as much as it lay in his power to do; and by his earnestness and attention, he always reaped great advantage from whatever he heard relating to piety. He was diligent in attending at the whole divine office, and all public prayer whenever he could; he heard mass every day with an edifying devotion, and when at work joined in desire with those who had the happiness to be always employed in singing the divine praises at the foot of the altars. All the time that was not employed in labour and necessary duties he spent in his devotions either in the church or in private, having his beads always in his hands. Under his painful and assiduous labour he had led a most abstemious life, and secretly gave all that he was able to save of his wages to the poor. He studied always to conceal his devotions and other virtues from the eyes of men; but through the veil of his extreme humility they spread the brighter rays. Such was his meekness that under sickness or other afflictions, nothing that could savour of complaint or murmuring was ever heard from his mouth; he was an utter stranger to all resentment, and was sweet and affable to the whole world. When children or others reviled and insulted him, he made no other return than by good words, and by praying for them. He frequented the sacraments with extraordinary devotion, and went every day to confession; not out of scrupulosity, either magnifying small imperfections into great sins, or apprehending sin by a disordered imagination where a sound judgment discovers no shadow of evil, but out of a great desire of preserving the utmost purity of conscience, that his soul might be worthy to praise Him who is infinite purity and sanctity, and before whom the very angels are not without spot, that is, they appear all imperfection if compared to him. The saint was so solicitous to give all his actions to God with the most pure and perfect intention that he feared a fault of immortification, or idle curiosity in a glance of the eye to look at the flight of a bird if it any way distracted his mind, or hindered his recollection and attention to God at his work. When by old age he was no longer able to follow his day-labour, a certain pious lawyer gave him a lodging in his own house, and the servant of God lived by daily alms that were sent him, of which he never reserved anything to the next day: but what he retrenched from his own meal he gave away to those whom he thought in the greatest distress. He died on the 10th of June, 1315. An incredible concourse of people resorted to the little chamber in which his body lay exposed, and three notaries, appointed by the magistrates to take in writing an account of the miracles wrought by God at his relics, compiled a few days before his burial a relation of two hundred and seventy-six. Out of devotion to his memory every one sought to obtain some little part of his small furniture, which consisted only of a hairshirt, a log of wood which served him for a pillow, and twigs, cords, and straw, which made up his hard bed. The Italians call him St. Rigo, the diminutive of the name Arrigo or Henry. See his life written by Dominic, bishop of Treviso, an eyewitness of his virtues, in the Bolland. t. 20, ad Junij 10, p. 368, and Contin. of Fleury’s Eccles. History.

Rev. Alban Butler (1711–73).  Volume VI: June. The Lives of the Saints.  1866.

SOURCE : http://www.bartleby.com/210/6/104.html

Beato Enrico da Bolzano Laico, venerato a Treviso


Enrico era nato a Bolzano verso il 1250 e fu un povero operaio. A un certo punto si trasferì a Treviso con la moglie e il figlio e, dopo la loro morte, visse in una stanzetta messagli a disposizione da un notaio. A Bolzano e a Treviso fu ammirato come assiduo frequentatore di chiese (a Treviso ogni giorno visitava tutte le chiese della città) e ascoltatore di Messe. Molto ammirata fu la sua vita di penitente: dormiva su un duro giaciglio, portava un ruvido saio, praticava lunghe veglie in preghiera. Quando si spense, solo nella sua cella, il popolo disse che era morto un santo. I funerali richiamarono tantissima gente e furono accompagnati da prodigi. E per lungo tempo ci furono pellegrinaggi che condussero dalle città vicine migliaia di persone all'arca del poverello, collocata nel Duomo di Treviso. Una commissione vescovile registrò trecentoquarantasei presunti miracoli, ascoltando testimoni oculari. Uno di questi era il suo biografo, Pier Domenico di Baone, che fu più tardi vescovo di Treviso. Una sua reliquia nel 1759 fu portata nel Duomo di Bolzano. (Avv.)

Etimologia: Enrico = possente in patria, dal tedesco

Martirologio Romano: A Treviso, beato Enrico da Bolzano, che, boscaiolo e analfabeta, distribuiva tutto ai poveri e, per quanto indebolito nel fisico, mendicava tuttavia saltuarie elemosine che spartiva con gli altri mendicanti.

 Nato a Bolzano verso il 1250, condusse la' dura vita del povero operaio. In epoca non precisata si trasferì a Treviso con la moglie e il figlio, e, dopo la loro morte, visse in un oscuro bugigattolo messogli a disposizione da un notaio. Negli ultimi anni si ridusse in estrema povertà, accettando l'elemosina. A Bolzano come a Treviso fu ammirato come assiduo frequentatore di chiese (a Treviso soleva visitare tutte le chiese della città ogni giorno) e avido ascoltatore di Messe. Più ammirata ancora fu la sua vita di penitente: dormiva su un duro giaciglio, portava un ruvido saio, praticava lunghe veglie in preghiera. Quando si spense, tutto solo nella sua cella, i trevisani dissero che era morto un santo. I funerali videro un concorso immenso di popolo e furono accompagnati da strepitosi prodigi. Seguirono per oltre un anno pellegrinaggi che condussero dalle città vicine migliaia di persone all'arca del poverello, collocata nel duomo di Treviso sopra un altare. Una commissione vescovile registrò in poco tempo trecentoquarantasei miracoli, per lo più guarigioni, su deposizione di testimoni oculari. Uno di questi fu il biografo di Enrico, Pier Domenico di Baone, che fu più tardi vescovo di Treviso. Ricognizioni delle reliquie si ebbero nel 1381 e nel 1712; una reliquia insigne nel 1759 fu portata a Bolzano ed è venerata nel duomo. In queste diocesi sorsero alcune chiese a lui dedicate. Il culto del beato fu approvato da Benedetto XIV, per la diocesi di Treviso, e da Pio VII, per quella di Trento.

Autore: Igino Rogger