dimanche 6 mars 2016

Bienheureux JOURDAIN de PISE, prêtre dominicain

Bienheureux Jourdan de Pise

Frère Prêcheur ( v. 1311)

ou Jourdain de Pise.

Il naquit à Pise et entra chez les Frères Prêcheurs. Après ses études à Paris, il retourna en Italie et se fit une grande réputation de prédicateur à Florence et en Toscane. Il prêchait en effet dans la langue populaire et non pas en latin. Il est l'un des créateurs de la langue italienne. Son culte fut approuvé en 1833. 


Prêtre de l’Ordre des Prêcheurs, qui exposa au peuple, dans sa propre langue, les plus hautes vérités avec la plus grande simplicité à Plaisance en Émilie.


Martyrologe romain


Blessed Jordan of Pisa, OP (AC)


Born in Pisa, Italy; died 1311; (cultus approved in 1833), beatified in 1838. At a time when scholars believed that no colloquial tongue could ever replace Latin as a gentleman's language, Jordan worked to make Italian the beautiful tongue that it is today. That's not the reason he was beatified by the Church but it's interesting and sometimes overlooked.


Jordan attended the University of Paris where he first encountered the Dominican friars in 1276. Four years later, probably after obtaining his degrees, he returned to Italy and took the habit. He began a long teaching career there as soon as he was qualified to do so.

Because of the excellence of his preaching in Florence, Jordan was appointed first lector there in 1305. He seems to have been fascinated with the whole question of preaching as an apostolic tool, and to have been one of the first to make a scientific study of it. He pointed out that the Greek church was "invaded by a multitude of errors," because the Greeks had no preachers; he could never say enough in praise of Saint Dominic's farsightedness in establishing an order specifically for preaching.
Jordan studied methods of making sermons more effective, both by using examples that would reach the people, and by the use of the vernacular. This latter was a much-disputed subject in his day (they had Dan Amon's then, too); Jordan was considered a daring innovator. Because it was controversial, he strove to make Italian a beautiful instrument on which he could play the melodies of the Lord.

Blessed with an extraordinary memory, Jordan is supposed to have known the breviary by heart, as well as the missal, most of the Bible (with its marginal commentary), plus the second part of the Summa. This faculty of memory he used in his sermons, but he was quick to point out to young preachers that learning alone can never make a preacher. By the holiness of his own life he made this plain, and continually preached it to those he was training to preach.

Jordan of Pisa had two great devotions--to Our Blessed Mother and to Saint Dominic. Once he was favored with a vision of Our Lady; she came into the fathers' refectory and served at table. Jordan, who was the only one who could see her, could barely eat for excitement. He spoke often of her in his sermons, and also of Saint Dominic. He founded a number of confraternities in Pisa, one of which has lasted until now.


Jordan died on his way to Paris to teach at Saint Jacques. His body was returned from Piacenza, where death overtook him, to rest in the church at Pisa (Benedictines, Dorcy). 




Blessed Jordan of Pisa

Memorial Day: March 6th

Profile

    At a time when scholars believed that no colloquial tongue could ever replace Latin as a gentleman's language, Jordan worked to make Italian the beautiful tongue that it is today. That's not the reason he was beatified by the Church but it's interesting and sometimes overlooked.

    Jordan attended the University of Paris where he first encountered the Dominican friars in 1276. Four years later, probably after obtaining his degrees, he returned to Italy and took the habit. He began a long teaching career there as soon as he was qualified to do so.

    Because of the excellence of his preaching in Florence, Jordan was appointed first lector there in 1305. He seems to have been fascinated with the whole question of preaching as an apostolic tool, and to have been one of the first to make a scientific study of it. He pointed out that the Greek church was "invaded by a multitude of errors," because the Greeks had no preachers; he could never say enough in praise of Saint Dominic's farsightedness in establishing an order specifically for preaching.
  
  Jordan studied methods of making sermons more effective, both by using examples that would reach the people, and by the use of the vernacular. This latter was a much-disputed subject in his day (they had Dan Amon's then, too); Jordan was considered a daring innovator. Because it was controversial, he strove to make Italian a beautiful instrument on which he could play the melodies of the Lord.

    Blessed with an extraordinary memory, Jordan is supposed to have known the breviary by heart, as well as the missal, most of the Bible (with its marginal commentary), plus the second part of the Summa. This faculty of memory he used in his sermons, but he was quick to point out to young preachers that learning alone can never make a preacher. By the holiness of his own life he made this plain, and continually preached it to those he was training to preach.

    Jordan of Pisa had two great devotions--to Our Blessed Mother and to Saint Dominic. Once he was favored with a vision of Our Lady; she came into the fathers' refectory and served at table. Jordan, who was the only one who could see her, could barely eat for excitement. He spoke often of her in his sermons, and also of Saint Dominic. He founded a number of confraternities in Pisa, one of which has lasted until now.

    Jordan died on his way to Paris to teach at Saint Jacques. His body was returned from Piacenza, where death overtook him, to rest in the church at Pisa (Benedictines, Dorcy).

Born:1255 at Pisa, Italy

Died: August 19, 1311 at Piacenza of natural causes while on his way to teach in Paris; relics venerated at the church of Saint Catalina at Pisa, Italy

Beatified: August 23, 1833 (cultus confirmed) by Pope Gregory XVI; 1838 (beatification)

First Vespers:

Ant. Strengthen by holy intercession, O Jordan, confessor of the Lord, those here present, have we who are burdened with the weight of our offenses may be relieved by the glory of thy blessedness, and may by thy guidance attain eternal rewards.

V. Pray for us, Blessed Jordan.

R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Lauds:

Ant. Well done, good and faithful servant, because Thou has been faithful in a few things, I will set thee over many, sayeth the Lord.

V. The just man shall blossom like the lily.

R. And shall flourish forever before the Lord.

Second Vespers:
Ant. I will liken him unto a wise man, who built his house upon a rock..
V. Pray for us. Blessed Jordan.
R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Prayer:

Let us Pray:  O God who didst make the Blessed Jordan, Thy Confessor, a minister meet for the preaching of the Gospel, grant that we, in imitation of him, may do the works which Thou ordainest, and so gain the fruit of eternal salvation. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Prayer II:

God of holiness, by the integrity of his life and gentle manner you made Blessed Jordan a fitting minister to preach the gospel. By following his example may we generously strive to serve you through service to our neighbor and so gain the fruit of an everlasting reward. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Ghost, one God, for ever and ever. - General Calendar of the Order of Preachers

SOURCE : http://www.willingshepherds.org/Dominican%20Saints%20March.html#Jordan

Blessed Jordan of Pisa

Profile

Joined the Dominicans at Pisa, Italy in 1280. Educated at the University of Paris, France. Lector at Sainta Maria Novella church in Florence, Italy in 1305. Noted preacher in and around Florence. Founded the Confraternity of the Holy Redeemer at Pisa. Professor of theology at Saint James Friary, Paris in 1311. A visionary, Jordan had two great devotions – Our Lady and Saint Dominic de Guzman.

Made a scientific study of the use of preaching as an apostolic tool. Considered a daring innovator for extending the use of vernacular Italian as a beautiful, musical language of evangelization; his use of Italian and Tuscan helped lead to the modern Italian language. Knew the breviary, missal, most of the Bible (with commentary), and the second part of the Summa Theologica by heart. Quick to state that learning alone can never make a preacher; it needed a holiness of life.

Born

God of holiness, by the integrity of his life and gentle manner you made Blessed Jordan a fitting minister to preach the gospel. By following his example may we generously strive to serve you through service to our neighbor and so gain the fruit of an everlasting reward. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. – General Calendar of the Order of Preachers


SOURCE : http://catholicsaints.info/blessed-jordan-of-pisa/